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>> "inside washington" is brought you in part by the american federation of government employees, proud to make america work. for more information about afge and membership, visit >> production assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. >> here we are at the 11th hour, and the president still is in serious about dealing with this .ssue right here i it is this issue, spending. >> this week on "inside washington," more fiscal cliff notes. susan rice takes her name off the board. >> i did not want to see a confmation process that w ry prolonged, very politicized, very distracting, very destructive. >> what do you think will happen to assad? >> killed. >> michigan, the home of the united auto workers, now a right to work state. >> and they have been guarding the governor's office all day. >> the supreme court will tackle a marria -- gay marriage. >> it is about time. captioned by the national captioning institute >> if we make it through december,
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehr said republicans
for the president's second term with david ignatius of the "washington post" and journalist and author james mann. >> woodruff: then, we turn back to the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, as more victims are laid to rest one week after the shootings. >> brown: speaking out for the first time since the massacre, the nra's wayne lapierre rejects calls for new limits on guns. >> i asked congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers invery single school in this nation. >> woodruff: and ray suarez talks to mark glaze, director of the pro-gun control advocacy group mayors against illegal guns. >> brown: plus, we hear from high school students from across the country, and gwen ifill talks with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman dates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and mic
>> welcome to the program. we're in washington for a conversation with al hunt and julianna goldman of blockberg news about the events this week, 9 fiscal cliff, questions about gun control, and others. >> was talking toome negotiating experts this week as i was work on a story about the relationship between the speaker and the president. and they say that in effective negotiation the person with the leverage needs to let the other party save face. and in this situation the president does hold the cards. he has the leverage and by giving the concessions on medicare, on medicaid, on social security, he would have taken a lot of heat from progressives who were already starting to hear that this week. and they that would have been through the saving face that could have helped john bayne never this. >> we continue with george stens founder of the kennedy center honors program and the american film institute. >> president kennedy said i look forward to an america that will not be afraid of grace and bite. i look forward to an american that will honor achievement in the arts, the way we
will vote on the republican plan b tomorrow. veterans of washington's budget battles wouldn't be surpriseto see a plan c or d before a final resolution is hammered out. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: the threat of the fiscal cliff was a big topic at an investor conference in new york today hosted by johnson controls. this wisconsin-based industrial conglomerate is a leading provider of products to make buildings energy efficient, and it's also the world's largest maker of car batteries and automotive seats. c.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the auto industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy automobiles. but my fear is that could change dramatically. >> susie: steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people are holding back on making
has the latest on washington's impasse on taxes and spending. >> ifill: then we examine nato's decision to send patriot anti- missile systems to turkey, as fears grow that syrian chemical weapons could cross the border. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown talks to mcclatchy newspapers' egypt correspondent nancy youssef about the massive antigovernment protests in cairo today. >> ifill: we continue our series of conversations about the fiscal cliff. tonight we hear from economist paul krugman. >> i don't think there's going to be much of a deal. i think there's going to be a kind of... there will be an outcome. >> woodruff: from haiti, fred de sam lazaro reports on the efforts to stem a deadly cholera epidemic that began after the 2010 earthquake. >> ifill: and ray suarez talks to author and journalist tom ricks about what he describes as the decline of american military leadership. >> today nobody gets credit for anything and mediocrity is accepted as a core value in the performance of generals. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has b
wahoo >> the house will stand in recess subject to the chair. >> this week on "in some washington" john boehner plus plan collapses and the house goes home for christmas. >> it is hard to wrap your mind around it but someone so young in such a peaceful community over such an ardent a bent pin down another massacre and another called for gun-control. >> the fact that this problem is complex can no longer be an excuse for doing nothing. >> handle after the state department report on benghazi, but are they the right ones? >> the security posture of the compound was inadequate for the threat environment, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attack which took place that night. >> will former republican senator chuck kagel and make it to the pentagon? >> the house did not take up the tax measure today because it did on have suffient support from our members to pass. house speaker john boehner's statement thursday evening as he stood in print of the republican conference, he recited the serenity prayer. god, grant me theereny to acpt the tngs which i cannot change and close t
. and we debate the benefits of extending unemployment insurance amid washington's fiscal uncertainty. >> woodruff: then we turn to the supreme court which agreed today to take up the issue of gay marriage. margaret warner looks at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from vi
in washington the debate is returning to the always thorny issue of gun control. members of congress are starting to be heard on gun law, heeding the president's call to act to prevent another atrocity. as he had on friday, the president pressed for change last night regardless he said of the politics. >> in the coming weeks i'll use whatever power this office holds to engage my fellow citizens from law enforcement to mental health professionals to parents and educators in an effort aimed at preventing more tragedies like this. >> suarez: today at the capitol, there were early signs of a possible break in the long dead lock on gun control. on ms-nbc west virginia senator joe said newtown has changed the conversation. >> i ask all my friends in the n.r.a. -- and i'm a proud n.r.a. member and always have been -- that we need to sit down and move this dialogue a sensible, reasonable approach to fixing it. it's part of it, not all of it. everything has to be on the table and i think it will be >> suaz: this afternn the senate opened with a moment of silence for the newtown victims. then
falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release of sunni prisoners. shi-ite prime minister nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 50million web users will he to provideheir real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading writers and bloggers insisted it's a new way
vacation to head back to washington, while harry reid says the country is headed toward the fiscal cliff. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we have the latest on efforts to avert the looming deadline from todd zwillich of public radio international. >> brown: then, geo-politics and children: russia moves to end adoptions by american parents. >> warner: what austerity measures look like at street level: we have a report from athens. >> by the end of 2013 greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technolog
'll be available for talks, adding ohio has both cell phone service and airports. darren gersh, nbr, washington >> susie: that stalemate over the fiscal cliff weighed on the markets today, despite some encouraging reporton the economy. investors shrugged off news that initial jobless claims fell more than expected during the latest week, retail sales bounced back in november, and wholesale prices declined last month. by the close, the dow tumbled 75 points, the nasdaq fell 22 and the s&p was off nine points. despite that pessimism, many investment managers and analysts are feeling optimistic about 2013. a new investor survey says the u.s. stock market will be the best performing stock market in the world. for details, john rogers joins us. he's c.e.o. of the cfa institute that conducted the survey. so john, the u.s. stock market ranked as the best performer. if we look at the charge of coming in in second place, china and brazil. why the vote of confidence considering all these concerns about the fiscal cliff? >> you're right, susie. it's interesting. it's a happy holiday season for investors.
of mourning played out once again today in newtown, connecticut. while in washington, president obama walked into the white house briefing room named for james brady-- the press secretary critically wounded in the shooting of president reagan in 1981-- to talk abt g violence. >> the fact fact that this pros complex can no longer be an excuse for doing nothing. >> ifill: instead, in the wake of the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, mr. obama said, "this time, the words need to lead to action" on gun violence. >> the vast majority of responsible law abiding gun owners would be some of the first to say that we should be able to keep an irresponsible law breaking few from buying a weapon of war. i'm willing to bet that they don't think that using a gun and using common sense are incompatible ideas. there is a big chunk of space between what the 2nd amendment means and having no rules at all. >> reporter: to that end, the president announced vice president biden and an administration team will craft recommendations on everything from gun laws to mental health, to be sent to congress by
: but the only real certainty appeared to be that lawmakers will be back in washington right after christmas if there's to be any deal before the new year's deadline. and to two reporters who've been closely watching this story. todd zwilch covers congress or pubc radio international's "thtakeawayon wnyc. and carol lee of the "wall street journal" joins us from the white house. thank you both for talking to us. carol, i'm going to start with you. from the white house perspective, where do things stand? >> i think from the white house perspective, the ball is essentially in the house john boehner's court. i think the president and his team of advisors feel that they've positioned him fairly well, that he's in a very defense i believe position in terms of his latest offer, that he forward yesterday. to the speaker. but if you step bck and thi out were were fou days ago versus where we are now, it's pretty remarkable how much the two sides have come to very close to reaching an actual deal. now the two sides are in this position where the job is to sell it to their different caucuses and make
, that is a millennium in washington for situations like this. so there is lots of time. >> susie: let me pick up on a point that you made about the market view about economic growth is coming for next year and the year after. let's talk about that. because even if there is a deal, there are worries that that deal is going to be a drag on the economy, what with higher tax rates, the removal of the payroll tax cut, possibly. isn't that bad for the economy going forward? >> susie, you're right. there will be some fiscal drag, some contraction, as spending cuts occur, as taxes go up somewhat, and as certain tax cuts, like the payroll tax cut, expires. but i think there is going to be a big boost to confidence, and i think there is going to be a broad clearing of the air as this issue is resolved. and there has been so much hesitation on the part of employers and businesses on investing and on hiring, i think that's going to be wiped away. and the result -- the net rest isoing to be an improved growth rate in 2013, and especially big growth rates in 2014 and 2015. >> susie: roger, we have less than a
-war in washington, from one half of the team that produced the deficit-cutting plan republicans say is their inspiration, democrat erskine bowles. >> there are over $7 trillion worth of economic events that are going to hit america in the gut. i think impact would be really strong. if anybody thinks this is going to be a slope better wake up. >> ifill: the link between brain injury and sports, new evidence ties repeated blows to the head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of the "national journal." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs n
and also getting representatives and senators elected to washington. i think they took their eye off t ball some extnt inhes local races. well now we see what happens when you don't have the feet on the ground, the money in the local races, you end up with state legislatures that are unfriendly to labor causes. so i think the wake-up call for labor nationally to focus on some of these states. i'm thinking about ohio now. ohio passed and then repealed a limit on collective bargaining for public employees but it doesn't mean that the issue won't come up there again. states like pennsylvania are not right to work ates. there aretil oprtunites or the conrvate mement, the antilabor movement, to go in for right to work. i think someone maybe in the labor movement will say, okay, we draw a land in the sand with michigan. we can't let this spread any further because there's clearly a domino effect. >> woodruff: what about that, bill? how do you see this in the grand scheme of the face-off that continues now between organized labor and those who believe it's what organized labor does hurts... can h
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)